The Story of Yew

One evening, a dear soulmate suggested I discover my ‘higher self’ name by sounding it out. I lay there and closed my eyes to wait for a sound to come to my inner ears. A sound starting with Y popped up in my mind, and then I finished it off with ‘ou’ and intuited that it would be spelled Yew. That was it* I didn’t comprehend that Yew is a type of tree, and had no clue that it even existed at all! After reading about it, I learnt that it has very similar meaning to the Holly (my name) tree, and even more perfect with synchronicity, my birthday is on Halloween. Read how this all links together below:

The yew tree is traditionally known to be resilient, strong, and hearty. Some of the oldest living yews are logged at being over 7000 years old. Commonly growing next to churches and within cemeteries, they are known to symbolize protection, healing, as well as life, death, and regeneration after difficult times. The ability of the yew tree to sprout new roots from branches that touch the ground parallels the hope for the utopians to sprout holistic and resilient new developments for the present and future generations.

The link between the inevitable death of current generations and the happy success of the current increasingly needs to be adaptive and responsible in regards to considering the unsustainable nature of our society, including the rising toxicity and loss of nature itself.

“How could you rise anew if you have not first become ashes? — Friedrich Nietzsche 

The Yew in Yewtopia is envisioned as a protector of the loving intentions of those involved in the greater good, creating a strong sense of nature that is alive and well; As nature is nurtured, we can be stretched upwards towards the hopeful emergence of enlightening, creative, sustainable, community economic development.

We are striving and growing within the shared space to showcase innate talent, natural beauty, deep truths; Sparking empowering growth & healing journeys.

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